Judah Adashi
Beth Anderson
Lembit Beecher
Daniel Binelli
Richard Brooks
Mark Carlson
Gary Eskow
Joel Feigin
Steven R. Gerber
Charles Griffin
Ernesto Halffter
Barbara Harbach
Michael Kaulkin
Meyer Kupferman
Elodie Lauten
Eleni Lomvardou
Benjamin Lees
Peri Mauer
Carl MaultsBy
Parthenia
Tamara Salukvadze
Judith Shatin
Fredrik Sixten
Haskell Small
Dame Ethel Smyth
Meira Warshauer
Willa Webber
Li Yiding
Judith Lang Zaimont
Women's Work
Lev 'Ljova' Zhurbin

Argentinean Composers

Bulgarian Composers

Japanese Composers












Women's Work

A concert series, presented by Greenwich House Arts and hosted by Beth Anderson, that explores recent music by prominent contemporary women composers from Asia, the Americas and Europe.


Below read reviews of the March 18 and March 25, 2009 concerts:

Women's Work 2009
March 18 – Piano on a Wire
Jenny Lin, piano
Greenwich House Music School


Reviewed by Mark Greenfest
Jenny Lin can do anything she wants to at a keyboard – anything at all. She's that astute and athletic – a tremendous performer.
Women's Work Composers

Visit Women's Work at http://www.myspace.com/womenswork.

For more information, please contact Greenwich House Music School at 212-242-4770. For more information about other GH Arts performances, visit here.

Article 1 to 3 – Rozalie Hirs – Being a scientist – a chemical engineer, these piano etudes get into a real exploration of the instrument, the firs, pounding resonance of the strings and the body of the piano, the second on the weightlessness of the keys, - too methodical to be called quixotic – yet very light fingered, and the third based upon a small cell of Debussy's alternates between romantic arpeggios and a brief, modern deconstruction of it.

Quadro parlante – Tzu-Ling Sarana Chou – Influenced by Rembrandt's self-portraits, this solo piano piece opens with sharp attacks and reverberant decays for the left hand, loud and chiseled. Then, the dynamics soften, with a gentler, then gradually aggressive modern arpeggio. A fugue lends clarity and structure to the more abstract galloping rhythms.

Estudios entre Preludios – Grabiela Ortiz – This talented Mexican composer plays with light and color in a more ethereal vein, influenced by Ligeti – and also by Debussy, Bartok and Takemitsu. Rhythmic arpeggios fly by at lightning speed after beautifully colored, reflective harmonies languor. The final arpeggios are exquisitely light-fingered as well as being lightning fast.

Calendar Music – Laura Kaminsky – Written for young pianists, with the character of each month in mind, this series of twelve calendar sketches seems splendid. January has its cold simplicity, February a rubato, March a robust, vigorous and invigorating energy, April, a lively blossoming, and so on. Written for the Lucy Moses School.

Air and Buenos Aires - Laura Schwendinger – Intelligently organized and very musical – the rising lines in the air start out gently – wistful – and grow in energy and rhythmic complexity. It becomes intensely virtuosic, but it is also most satisfying.

Orrizonte for piano and electronics – Missy Mazzoli – Opening with sine waves – and originally written for a delapidated piano that has been left outside in the air for a year – there is something elemental, but also puckish, and delightfully musical about this modern but calming piece.

my lips from speaking – Julia Wolfe – Ending with a piece originally written for six pianos – in a pulsating neo-minimalist style with brisk attacks and large pauses that is a lot of fun in an avante, challenging way. It rocks like the Beatles.

* * * * *
Women's Work 2009
March 25 – Female Persuasion
Mary Hurlbut, soprano
Andrew Bolotowsky, flutes
Mimi Stern-Wolfe, piano.
Greenwich House Music School


Reviewed by Mark Greenfest

These accomplished performers cover a lot of musical ground with intelligence, wit and grace.

The program opened with an Aria from "Cepahle et Procris" (1694) - gorgeous Baroque music of Elisabeth-Claude Jacquet de al Guerre (1665-1729).

Three Songs From Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" – Lucy F. Coolidge - The piano cadences capture rhythmic patterns to support the iambic pentameter of Shakespeare's poetry, and the settings are sweet and appealing.

"Los Pajaros Blancos de la Noche Profunda" - Judith Sainte Croix -Remarkably atmospheric – delicate piano rhythms and colorful flute trills mimic the bird-filled rain forest. More color and flavor than, say, Debussy's etudes.

Nightsong - Beth Anderson – Lively interplay among the lyrical soprano, flute and piano lines frame the humorous and excited poetry about a woman on the verge of a nervous breakdown. In her won voice, Ms. Anderson's piece has the colorful lyricism and humorous richness that one associates with Sondheim and very few others.

"On The Wind" for flute and pre-recorded flutes – Sorrell Hays – Known for her rich humor and musicality, Ms. Hays' piece for flute and pre-recorded flutes skirts on the edge of a whimsical cataclysm, with lively and dramatic effect.

"Why Michelle" for solo flute – Lenore Von Stein – Broken, staccato flute lines – continuous in a discontinuous way, humorously and lyrically paint an impassioned and mock-strident portrait.

"Uxudo Songs" for soprano and flute – Anne Tardos – Multilingual poetry – sense and nonsense – gets a full-bodied, modern-leaning and quixotic treatment for soprano vocals, flute or large traverse flute. The musical treatment falls between polysyllabic play and melodic invention. ("We eat your parents?")

Dark Songs – Beth Anderson – With poetry by Dana Gioia (the NEA Chairman), darkly or romantically humorous in itself, Ms. Anderson's poetic, rhythmically and melodically lively settings allowing the singer to express a lot of personality are most delightful.

"O Mistress Mine" (Songs from Shakespeare) for soprano and flute – Tamara Bliss – With a dancing flute line poetically gamboling in a range both modern and baroque, the tightly-focused vocal line conveys Shakespeare's poetry with incisive directness.

"December" for soprano and flute - Tui St. George Tucker – The Germanic lied and rich flute part create involved harmonics with braided melodies.

Women's Work Composers "The Five-Petal Proportion" (2008) for voice, flute and electronic sounds – Elodie Lauten – Flute, voice and electronic sounds get a full bodied, luscious, tres French treatment with a rhythmic track, a free melodic flute, and a most colorful and lyrical soprano – gorgeous sound.

"Portrait: Valse Chantee" for soprano, flute and piano – Cecile Chaminade – For French chanteuse and trilling flute, with a steady piano accompaniment, this piece is lovely, charming and strong.

Women's Work 2009 Concert Series
By Jeffrey James

I recently had the great pleasure of attending both of the 2009 Women's Work concerts 2009 at Renee Weiler Concert Hall of Greenwich House Music School in New York City.

In the interest of full disclosure, I help promote the concerts and also represent series host Beth Anderson as well as composer Elodie Lauten, so I came there well versed in their music and knowing what to expect. I have also worked with Judith Sainte Croix, so had a good knowledge of her compositions as well. However, one of the things I have always enjoyed about these concerts is the wonderful discoveries that the performers and performances bring to the audience.

This year's Women's Work concerts, on March 18 and 25, were a great success, with both programs offering many of these discoveries to very enthusiastic, sold-out audiences.

We were very fortunate to have three reviews of this year's programs, one from Allan Kozinn of the New York Times, and two by freelance reviewer Mark Greenfest, both of which are included below.

In the March 18 program, pianist Jenny Lin explored a selection of keyboard repertoire by Laura Kaminsky, Missy Mazzoli, Rozalie Hirs, Tzu-Ling Sarana Chou, Gabriela Ortiz, Laura Schwendinger, and Julia Wolfe. The program featured Kaminsky's "Calendar Music" (co-commissioned by the Lucy Moses School and Women's Work) and culminated with Wolfe's "My Lips from Speaking" for six pianos adapted for solo piano and tape.

Allan Kozinn reviewed the concert for the New York Times, and described the selections thusly, "That they are written by women is the least notable thing about them, and that, in a way, is a measure of the progress women have made in recent decades." He characterized Jenny Lin as a pianist, "whose specialty is virtuosic contemporary music and who chose works that mostly had in common assertiveness and muscularity." Mark Greenfest wrote that Ms. Lin, "can do anything she wants to at a keyboard – anything at all. She's that astute and athletic – a tremendous performer."

"Article 1 to 3" (2003), a "prismatic" score by Rosalie Hirs, was described by the Times reviewer as, "intent on mining the piano's vast palette."

Kozinn described Gabriela Ortiz's "Estudios Entre Preludios" (1998) as "her gentle-voiced, gracefully flowing preludes (being) homages to Debussy and Takemitsu, and her more fiery, rhythmically pointed and occasionally pugilistic études pay(ing) tribute to Bartok and Ligeti.

Taiwanese composer Tzu-Ling Sarana Chou's "Quadro Parlante" (2003), inspired by Rembrandt's self portraits was described by Kozinn as having, "language (that) is modern and thorny, and it moves (sometimes by way of sudden shifts) between wildness and restraint."

Mr. Kozinn wrote of Laura Kaminsky's "Calendar Music" (2008) " (it) is a dozen short movements with energetic, extroverted pieces, quirky tone painting (the bird song in "July," for example) and ruminative movements interspersed. Ms. Kaminsky wrote these pieces for young, apparently sophisticated students, and the set has an appealing symmetry, with "January" and "December" sharing a choralelike spirit and several internal movements linked as well."

Mr. Greenfest called Laura Schwendinger's Air and Buenos Aires, "Intelligently organized and very musical – the rising lines in the air start out gently – wistful – and grow in energy and rhythmic complexity. It becomes intensely virtuosic, but it is also most satisfying."

He also wrote about Mizzy Mazzoli's "Orizzonte" (2004), "there is something elemental, but also puckish, and delightfully musical about this modern but calming piece."

And finally, Kozinn's words about Julia Wolfe's "my lips from speaking" (1993), "A figure from an Aretha Franklin song ("Think") supplies the raw material, but Ms. Wolfe fragmented and expanded on it considerably, yielding a vast, often aggressive mountain of sound." Mr. Greenfest wrote, "a pulsating neo-minimalist style with brisk attacks and large pauses that is a lot of fun in an avante, challenging way. It rocks like the Beatles."

I would add the Ms. Lin certainly covered an enormous span of styles and performance techniques and amplify Mr. Greenfest's words about her being "astute and athletic." This athleticism gives her a fascinating presence onstage and creates an exciting performance tension that allows her to move easily within a wide range of music, and even, for example within the Gabriela Ortiz Estudios Entre Preludios, shift seamlessly from atmosphere to atmosphere within the piece. Here reputation as a first-rate performer of new music is well deserved.

The March 25 program presented songs written for combinations of soprano, piano, and flutes, including works by Elizabeth-Claude Jacquet de la Guerre, Cecile Chaminade, Beth Anderson, Lenore Von Stein, Judith Sainte Croix, Elodie Lauten, and Tamara Bliss. Performers were Mary Hurlbut, soprano; Andrew Bolotowsky, flutes; and Mimi Stern-Wolfe, piano.

About Three Songs from Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" by Lucy F. Coolidge, reviewer Mark Greenfest wrote, "the piano cadences capture rhythmic patterns to support the iambic pentameter of Shakespeare's poetry, and the settings are sweet and appealing."

He also wrote, "Judith Sainte Croix's "Los Pajaros Blancos de la Noche Profunda" is remarkably atmospheric – delicate piano rhythms and colorful flute trills mimic the bird-filled rain forest. More color and flavor than, say, Debussy's etudes."

He described Nightsong by Beth Anderson as having "Lively interplay among the lyrical soprano, flute and piano lines frame the humorous and excited poetry about a woman on the verge of a nervous breakdown. In her won voice, Ms. Anderson's piece has the colorful lyricism and humorous richness that one associates with Sondheim and very few others."

Of Sorrell Hays' "On the Wind" for flute and pre-recorded flutes Greenfest said, "Known for her rich humor and musicality, Ms. Hays' piece for flute and pre-recorded flutes skirts on the edge of a whimsical cataclysm, with lively and dramatic effect."

"Why Michelle" for solo flute by Lenore Von Stein was characterized by the reviewer as, "Broken, staccato flute lines – continuous in a discontinuous way, humorously and lyrically paint an impassioned and mock-strident portrait."

"Uxudo Songs" for soprano and flute by Anne Tardos (written to multilingual poetry) "gets a full-bodied, modern-leaning and quixotic treatment for soprano vocals, flute or large traverse flute. The musical treatment falls between polysyllabic play and melodic invention. ("We eat your parents?" was one of the texts)."

Mr. Greenfest wrote of Dark Songs by Beth Anderson, with poetry by Dana Gioia (the NEA Chairman), "darkly or romantically humorous in itself, Ms. Anderson's poetic, rhythmically and melodically lively settings allow the singer to express a lot of personality are most delightful."

He said of Tamara Bliss' "O Mistress Mine" (Songs from Shakespeare) for soprano and flute, "With a dancing flute line poetically gamboling in a range both modern and baroque, the tightly-focused vocal line conveys Shakespeare's poetry with incisive directness."

Of "December" for soprano and flute by Tui St. George Tucker he mentioned , "the Germanic lied and rich flute part create involved harmonics with braided melodies."

Elodie Lauten's "The Five-Petal Proportion" (2008) for voice, flute and electronic sounds, from her recent Two-Cents Opera, "(got) a full bodied, luscious, tres French treatment with a rhythmic track, a free melodic flute, and a most colorful and lyrical soprano – gorgeous sound."

The program concluded with Chaminade's "is lovely, charming and strong" "Portrait: Valse Chantee" for soprano, flute and piano.

Again, this program presented to the audience an enormous (and enlightening) span of styles and performance techniques, made even wider by the inclusion of the Elizabeth-Claude Jacquet de la Guerre and Cecile Chaminade works. The performances by Mary Hurlbut, soprano; Andrew Bolotowsky, flutes; and Mimi Stern-Wolfe, piano, special performers individually and collectively, were quite wonderful and showed the full range of their well-known gifts.

This concert was especially significant as it was a gathering of many of the composers of the works presented. Beth Anderson, Elodie Lauten, Anne Tardos, Lucy Coolidge, Judith Sainte Croix, Lenore Von Stein and Tamara Bliss were all at the concert.

One important element to note is the inclusion of brief composer interviews by Beth Anderson between the pieces on both concerts. I honestly believe that new music is best introduced to audiences by the composers themselves. The connection with the real person behind the music, especially in as intimate a setting as Renee Weiler Concert Hall, is palpable and elicits a more receptive tone than might otherwise be present.

Podcast interviews were recorded with several of the composers on each of the two programs and will soon be available on http://www.myspace.com/womenswork.

The series venue, Greenwich House Music School, a division of Greenwich House Arts, is a fixture in Manhattan and provides affordable music lessons and musical events for students and audiences of all ages. A distinguished faculty teaches beginners as well as those who are returning to musical study either as an avocation or with professional aspirations. Today, they continue the tradition of providing a performance series for the community. In the Renee Weiler Concert Hall, New York audiences can hear classical music and opera as well as ethnic, jazz, contemporary and folk music. We are very grateful to them for hosting this series and providing such generous support. You can find more about Greenwich House Arts and Music School at http://www.gharts.org/.

Series host Beth Anderson's music has been described as having "a refreshing simplicity without naiveté" and as –"deeply felt, direct, and yes, beautiful" and "charming and deeply felt to the point of romanticism." Her latest CDs are new recordings by Nancy Boston of September Swale as part of American Women: Modern Voices in Piano Music and Aleksandra Maslovaric's recordings of Belgian Tango and Tales #1 & #3 for violin and piano on Feminae in Musica. For more information about Ms. Anderson, including a bio, videos, list of works, discography and much more, please visit http://www.beand.com.

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